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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

6 edition of Japanese military strategy in the Pacific War found in the catalog.

Japanese military strategy in the Pacific War

James B. Wood

Japanese military strategy in the Pacific War

was defeat inevitable?

by James B. Wood

  • 49 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Rowman & Littlefield in Lanham, MD .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementJames B. Wood.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsD
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 141 p. :
Number of Pages141
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22761459M
ISBN 109780742553408

WILLIAMSTOWN - In his book "Japanese Military Strategy in the Pacific War: Was Defeat Inevitable?" (Rowman & Littlefield, ) historian James Wood challenges the conventional wisdom that Japan's. The Japanese Empire Grand Strategy from the Meiji Restoration to the Pacific War. Get access. the book's interpretation of the Japanese case as a cautionary tale in the history of international relations is compelling.' A Military History of the Russo-Japanese War Cited by: 7.

The “Future War” that Dr. Friedman’s title speaks of is of course the U.S. Navy’s Pacific War, which turned very narrowly on the carrier battles of Both sides developed these unique, powerful striking forces from scratch and over 20 years for this specific moment. So why did the US. Blind Boxes Collectibles Family & Classic Games Mind, Memory & Logic Party Games Puzzles Strategy Games Trend See All > Pacific Theater - World War II - Japan. 1 - 20 of results Publish your book with B&N. Learn More.

In this provocative history, James B. Wood challenges the received wisdom that Japan's defeat in the Pacific was historically inevitable. He argues instead that it was only when the Japanese military prematurely abandoned its original sound strategic plan--to secure the resources Japan needed and establish a viable defensible perimeter for the Empire--that the Allies were able to regain the. The novel predicted a Japanese surprise attack on U.S. naval forces in the Pacific, the Allies’ island hopping strategy used during the actual Pacific War, and the eventual U.S. victory over Japan.


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Japanese military strategy in the Pacific War by James B. Wood Download PDF EPUB FB2

In this provocative history, James B. Wood challenges the received wisdom that Japan's defeat in the Pacific was historically inevitable. He argues instead that it was only when the Japanese military prematurely abandoned its original sound strategic plan—to secure the resources Japan needed and establish a viable defensible perimeter for the Empire—that the Allies were able to regain the /5(6).

The author shied away from speaking about specific tactical decisions (that is, particular battles), but stuck to military strategy. The Japanese needed to delay, delay, delay in any war with the USA, and hope for war-weariness or a German victory in Europe for them to be able to negotiate a favorable peace/5.

Japanese Military Strategy in the Pacific War: Was Defeat Inevitable. - Kindle edition by Wood, James B. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Japanese Military Strategy in the Pacific War: Was Defeat Inevitable?/5(5).

In this provocative history, James B. Wood challenges the received wisdom that Japan's defeat in the Pacific was historically inevitable. He argues instead that it was only when the Japanese military prematurely abandoned its original sound strategic plan--to secure the resources Japan needed and establish a viable defensible perimeter for the Empire--that the Allies were able to regain the 3/5(1).

In this provocative history, James B. Wood challenges the received wisdom that Japan's defeat in the Pacific was historically inevitable.

He argues instead that it was only when the Japanese military prematurely abandoned its original sound strategic plan—to secure the resources Japan needed and establish a viable defensible perimeter for the Empire—that the Allies were able to regain the.

The Japanese Empire: Grand Strategy from the Meiji Restoration to the Pacific War by S.C.M. Paine, and: To Stand with the Nations of the World: Japan's Meiji Restoration in World History by Mark Ravina (review) Scott C.M. Bailey; Journal of World History; University of Hawai'i Press; Vol Number 3, September ; pp.

Author: Scott C.M. Bailey. Blunting the Japanese Onslaught Throughout the winter and spring of the war news reaching the United States from the Pacific was grim.

The Japanese amassed a vast new empire with a defensive perimeter that ranged from western Alaska to the Solomon Islands. Japanese military strategies in Jump to The failure of the Midway Operation was caused by slight negligence, but the effects were so tremendous that Japanese Army operations in the Pacific were shaken to their very roots.

The Japanese Army in the Pacific War. Marine Corps Association. The book argues that the Japanese army and navy had both the opportunity and the capability to have fought a different and more successful war and Wood outlines 10 key factors that might have led to any number of alternate outcomes for the Japanese-American showdown in the Pacific.

Japan’s strategy in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. The Japanese war plan, aimed at the American, British, and Dutch possessions in the Pacific and in Southeast Asia, was of a rather makeshift character. The first draft, submitted by the chiefs of the Army and Navy General Staff, was accepted by Imperial General Headquarters early in.

The Pacific War, sometimes called the Asia–Pacific War, was the theater of World War II that was fought in the Pacific and was geographically the largest theater of the war, including the vast Pacific Ocean theater, the South West Pacific theater, the South-East Asian theater, the Second Sino-Japanese War, and the Soviet–Japanese War.

The Second Sino-Japanese War between the Location: East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia. CHAPTER World War II: The War Against Japan. In World War II, for the first time, the United States had to fight a war on two fronts. Though the central strategic principle governing allocation of resources to the two fronts provided for concentrating first on the defeat of the European Axis, on the American side this principle was liberally interpreted, permitting conduct of an offensive.

Michael W. Myers University Press of Kansas: Conventional wisdom among scholars of World War II claims that Japan would inevitably lose the Pacific War to the United States and the Allies.

They base that belief on greater American military and economic power and a U.S. strategy that forced the war against Japan on a.

This video traces the progress of Japanese grand strategy from the end of WWI to the beginning of WWII. The key strategic question Japan sought to. 9 best books about the Pacific War World War II is sometimes thought of as primarily a fight against Nazi Germany, with the war in the Pacific as an : Terry Hartle.

A valuable reference source for Pacific War enthusiasts and historians, The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War provides a history of the IJN's deployment and engagements, analysis of the evolution of strategy and tactics, and finally addresses the question of whether it truly was a modern navy, fully prepared for the rigors of combat in /5().

The Japanese Empire: Grand Strategy from the Meiji Restoration to the Pacific War - Japanese grand strategy from the lateth to midth centuries. The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, - Pulitzer winning book on Japan during WW2.

Texts about military strategy take us back into the mists of time but what it is, and what the nature of war is, remains hotly debated. Antulio Echevarria II of the US Army War College talks us through key books, both old and new, on military strategy. Interview by Sophie Roell.

Japan’s Strategy Japan entered World War II with limited aims and with every in-tention of fighting a limited war. Its principal objectives were to secure the resources of Southeast Asia and much of China and to establish a “Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere” under Japanese hegemony.

InFile Size: 1MB. The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) was the third most powerful navy in the world at the start of World War II, and came to dominate the Pacific in the early months of the war. This was a remarkable turnaround for a navy that only began to modernize inalthough defeats inflicted on the Russians and Chinese in successive wars at the turn of the century gave a sense of the threat the IJN was.

Aizawa Japanese Strategy in the First Phase of the Pacific War 37 western offensive)” since the spring of in World War II - which had broken out in Europe in September - made a German invasion of Great Britain possible in the near future.

In fact, this produced. But here is the book’s limitation. Since V-J Day inhundreds of books have been published that review the Pacific War. The best justification for a Author: Michael Beschloss.Incident 3: In AprilPeace Osaka, a municipal museum dedicated to the Japanese experience of the Asia-Pacific War, closed its doors in order to overhaul the entire exhibit.

The museum had.